Justifying the Choices We Make

Do you ever make decisions outside the norm that you have to justify? Have you ever tried to explain a life choice you’ve made but failed to convey the “Why” behind the choice in the time frame given to explain? We are constantly making decisions about the way we choose to live our life. There are times when we make choices we know are correct for certain situations but have a hard time articulating why they are so. Often, we’re unclear the exact reasons why we make choices but we clearly know in our gut that they are right for our life. It can be hard to verbally (or internally) justify the choices we make. 

debateUndoubtedly, when you take a position outside the status quo, you will be forced to explain your set of choices on a irregular (or regular depending on how divergent the choice) basis to those following the crowd. If you choose to live debt free, retire early, or live a simple life you will be asked about why. If you choose to follow a religion (or not to follow one), live by specific philosophical principles, or make any unique life choices- you will certainly be asked to justify your position. Especially if you regularly interact with people that share different views than you do. Even if you just eat a little differently than your peers you will be asked to defend your reasoning. Continue reading Justifying the Choices We Make

I Should Be Doing Something Else

Do you ever have the thought: I Should Be Doing Something Else? It’s a classic dilemma. I get that feeling when I have an unfinished task that requires attention. It’s similar to the notion about being at work and thinking about your kids, spouse, or what you should be doing with your life; then, thinking about work when you should be relaxing, vacationing, sleeping, or enjoying your kids or family. If you have a knowledge type job or manage others, there is certainly the tendency to have your mind going in the background thinking through the endless possibilities of things that need to be done.

typewriter-801921_1280When we have a list of things that need to be done, whether written or simply in our head, we often feel internal guilt about not doing the “Things that need to be done”. It doesn’t always motivate us to actually do the urgent things but certainly makes doing any thing else less enjoyable. Another personal example is this: I enjoy reading, especially novels, non-fiction, and most long form content. However, when I was taking college classes, especially those that suggested (or demanded) lots of textbook reading, I always felt guilty if I read something other than the textbook in my free time. A rational person would simply say, finish reading your text, then you can relax and read whatever you want. However, instead of doing the rational thing, I would simply avoid reading all together. For some reason, other activities that didn’t compete as directly with the mental space dedicated to reading for class, were easily accomplished on my to-do list. Continue reading I Should Be Doing Something Else

Less Information, More Reflection

I’m addicted to new information. I enjoy listening to podcasts, reading plenty of non-fiction books, watching documentaries, perusing other blogs, following TED/YouTube series, and studying academic publications. In addition, I really enjoy meeting and learning from people who are a little older and a little wiser than myself. In essence, I find myself on the constant lookout for new information. Due to the nature of my employment, I must follow economic and financial (and sometimes political) news as well. I’m constantly bombarding myself with new data.

IMG_3724[1]I still find myself searching for more information when, often, I already have enough. I simply need to step back, reflect on it, and take action. I don’t really need to read more about the nuances of financial planning at this point. I need to spend more time reflecting on the choices I’ve made over the last six months and see if they align with my long term goals. I don’t need to read more about simplifying my life or organizing something a little better. I need to take inventory to see if I’m actually keeping everything organized and following simplistic principles. I need to spend much more time in reflection and less time consuming new information. (Picture is a nice little sticky note that covers up the second tab of my browser when I’m tempted to get distracted) Continue reading Less Information, More Reflection

From Tiny House to McMansion

Is 2,328 square feet crazy for four relatively small people? 3,500 sf? Can a wannabe minimalist own a huge house? Are the two mutually exclusive?

Well, we did it. We traded in the tiny house and bought a McMansion. Well, actually, we didn’t. We haven’t actually moved. We haven’t listed our current home. And we haven’t found the mythical “forever house”. But, I’ve noticed that my mindset has already started to drift. Things I previously considered off limits are now “affordable” and “convenient”. An extra bedroom, sure. Houses for our cars, why not? Commuting to work with traffic- everyone else doesn’t seem to mind. I’m amazed at how far my mind has traveled in the last few months. Maybe it’s time for me to get out the catheter and bedpan.

house6In turns out, a lot of people think like us. Family friendly, in-town, walkable, Ivy-league preschool district, open floor plan, park-friendly, and affordable*. These are the buzzwords of many young professionals and young families are striving to achieve in housing. However, I’ve learned first hand that the combination (especially the affordable* part) seems to be a bit of a mythical proposition in many different areas of the country. Our town is relatively small and the limited number of homes that meet the previously mentioned qualifications are sadly few and far between. However, if you strike the whole in-town/walkable part, the outskirts and suburbs have a plethora of options to meet the needs of discerning parents. So, if somethings got to give- what will it be? Continue reading From Tiny House to McMansion

The People We Love The Most

The holiday break and new year are often times where the activities of our life change. Growing up, it was a time where stress and responsibility went away and fun and relaxation filled every day. I wouldn’t say that holidays are stress free these days- but certainly the activities change and the grind of work or school flow into managing crazy kidschildren’s activities, spending time with friends, and entertaining extended family. In my life, I certainly notice that I have a lot more unstructured time to think and contemplate. In fact, I often push many of the family discussions about long-term plans to the end of the year when Ms. SE and I have a little time to spend together.

The question I need to evaluate and answer each year is this: How am I treating the people I love the most? Am I prioritizing the right people? Am I allocating my time and attention appropriately? And lastly, am I communicating my love in a way that the people I care about understand and internalize? Continue reading The People We Love The Most

A Year of Driving Only Electric

Last October we took the plunge and sold our gas sipping hybrid to make way for a fancy new electric car. With the federal and state incentives combined, we actually determined it would be the absolute cheapest form of automobile transportation possible for our family (12c per mile thus far). The transition was slight but we adapted rather quickly. Overall, we have been more than pleased with our Nissan Leaf over the last year and I’m convinced that electric cars are the future. The quick verdict: Success.

20141029_124030011_iOSOur family lives in a smaller college town and almost everything we need is less than five miles away from our home. I walk or ride my bike to work everyday and Ms. SE often uses the car to take the kiddos around and run errands during the day. We make occasional day trips around the state, and for longer trips, the Atlanta airport is about 70 miles from our home. Overall, we make good candidates for the first gen electric vehicle. Despite the hesitation about only being able to drive about 80-100 miles a day conveniently, range anxiety has been a surprisingly small issue. We have literally done zero maintenance and the car drives as well today as it did off the lot. Continue reading A Year of Driving Only Electric

The Pull of Complexity

I want my life to stay simple. But I’m often torn between the ideals of simplicity and the temptations of complex options. As our lives evolve and mature, we are constantly filled with new challenges, opportunities, and decision points. The natural movement of life is toward complexity. Ironically, it actually takes effort to maintain a simple life and a relaxed mindset. If we forget to pay attention, we will default life into a sea of unfulfilling commitments and an unproductive, busy, and stressful lifestyle.

complex-664440_1280We rarely cull our responsibilities. If left without consideration, we often pile more and more onto our already full plates. Our default is to accept new opportunities. We often add activities, relationships, projects, and extra-curiculars without an end goal in mind. We don’t even properly evaluate our current commitments before we add more. Without conscientiousness, we are pulled into a life of complexity. But we still have a choice. If we take the time, we can identify, evaluate, and eliminate- so we are left with only the simple things in life that truly bring us joy. We must actively seek the optimal path for ourselves and direct our life course to it. Continue reading The Pull of Complexity

You’re Probably Living Above Your Means

It’s true. More often than not, we shaft our future selves by making unwise or non-optimal choices today. Do we all live above our means? What exactly is “living above your means?” Living above our means is more than simply running out of money before each month ends. Honestly living within our means involves incorporating all of our values, future goals, risk, and future cost/spending into our current level of consumption.

moneyIt is certainly possible to earn a little more than we spend but still be living significantly above our means. Living paycheck to paycheck, consumer debt, and lack of emergency savings are outward expressions of over-consumption. However, I’ll make the argument that the subtler signs like inadequate future planning, being under-insured and failing to financially prepare for post-working years are all ways we mortgage our future interest for current consumption. In addition, our desire for more stuff (& money) often causes us to work more hours and spend more time away from the people we care about than the return we actually get from additional consumption. Understanding and evaluating the full consideration of our current and future needs will allow for proper planning about how to integrate all of our living costs into our current financial decisions. Continue reading You’re Probably Living Above Your Means

The Large House Dilemma

This is one article (3 of 3) on choosing the right type of house. Specifically, we are looking at the trade-offs between efficiency, sustainability, and practicality (excluding affordability) when choosing a home.

What size house do you buy when you can afford almost any size? That is the question we are all trying to address. When following the American Dream the answer is always: “Bigger is Better”. But is that really true? Do large homes come with their share of trade-offs? It’s established that most people work backwards when it comes to buying a house. We typically begin with a budget and see how nice/big/small/well-located of a house we can afford and choose the best option. The question then becomes, what do we do when we can afford almost any size house? Even really large houses. Are they still practical? We have already explored how many square feet it takes to be happy and tiny houses, but we’ll spend a little bit of time addressing the costs and benefits of large houses.

dave ramsey houseOur lives are in a constant state of evolution. Our wants, needs, goals and expectations continue to change and evolve as we age and enter different stages of life. We have lived in a large variety of different sized homes over the years and they all have their share of pluses and minuses. Tiny homes and large homes seem to polarize individuals about what is really needed to be happy. This post will examine the excitement and challenges that large homes offer. Will we end up in a large home? I’m not really sure at this point, but I’m certainly learning more about the benefits and troubles of huge home living. Continue reading The Large House Dilemma

The Tiny House Dilemma

This is one article (2 of 3) on choosing the right type of house. Specifically, we are looking at the trade-offs between efficiency, sustainability, and practicality (excluding affordability) when choosing a home.

What size house do you buy when you can afford almost any size? Is there a perfect home? Or do they all come with trade-offs? Most people work backwards when it comes to buying a house. They begin with a budget and see how nice/big/small/well-located of a house they can afford and choose the best option. But what happens when you have a nice income, an efficient spending plan, and live in an area where housing is extremely affordable relative to your other costs? We have already explored how many square feet it takes to be happy, but next we’ll look at the cost and benefits of tiny and huge houses.

elm-photo-slide-003_e9a51ac4-7f09-457f-9982-44fca367b51d_grandeWhen you take money out of the housing equation it brings about deeper fundamental issues. It forces us to ask, what is enough and what will actually make us happy? Do we need a large house? Is living in a small house actually desirable? Why not simply settle for something in the middle? The notion of Tiny House Living has been popularized over the last few years by minimalist authors, bloggers, financial personalities and television shows. But is a tiny house realistic when affordability is not an issue? What are the challenges of living small? And benefits as well?

Conceptually, I really enjoy the idea of having only what we need. It was quite refreshing to move into a relatively small place to force the paring down of essentials right after we got married. In fact, we have lived in a lot of different types and sizes of homes throughout the years. Living in inexpensive housing areas, we’ve lived in homes/condos ranging from 190 to 4500 square feet, and certainly interact with individuals on a weekly basis with homes within that range. But how do we decide what is right for us? Especially when our lives are constantly changing. While we enjoy watching shows and documentaries about tiny houses, for the purpose of discussion, tiny houses will be 200-850 square foot, single family homes. Our most recent move was from a 390 square foot studio to a 850 square foot single family home. With a family of four, we live comfortably but have certainly considered larger homes (but also much smaller condos overseas as well). Tiny might be a simple 1,200 sf single family ranch, a 700 sf condo, or even a basic 14 x 14 single room. You make your own definition, but we’ll spend some time thinking through the benefits and challenges of tiny and huge house living. By looking at the extremes, we can actually put greater context around the issues faced when deciding what type of dwelling to inhabit. Continue reading The Tiny House Dilemma