A Year of Driving Only Electric

Last October we took the plunge and sold our gas sipping hybrid to make way for a fancy new electric car. With the federal and state incentives combined, we actually determined it would be the absolute cheapest form of automobile transportation possible for our family (12c per mile thus far). The transition was slight but we adapted rather quickly. Overall, we have been more than pleased with our Nissan Leaf over the last year and I’m convinced that electric cars are the future. The quick verdict: Success.

20141029_124030011_iOSOur family lives in a smaller college town and almost everything we need is less than five miles away from our home. I walk or ride my bike to work everyday and Ms. SE often uses the car to take the kiddos around and run errands during the day. We make occasional day trips around the state, and for longer trips, the Atlanta airport is about 70 miles from our home. Overall, we make good candidates for the first gen electric vehicle. Despite the hesitation about only being able to drive about 80-100 miles a day conveniently, range anxiety has been a surprisingly small issue. We have literally done zero maintenance and the car drives as well today as it did off the lot. Continue reading A Year of Driving Only Electric

The Pull of Complexity

I want my life to stay simple. But I’m often torn between the ideals of simplicity and the temptations of complex options. As our lives evolve and mature, we are constantly filled with new challenges, opportunities, and decision points. The natural movement of life is toward complexity. Ironically, it actually takes effort to maintain a simple life and a relaxed mindset. If we forget to pay attention, we will default life into a sea of unfulfilling commitments and an unproductive, busy, and stressful lifestyle.

complex-664440_1280We rarely cull our responsibilities. If left without consideration, we often pile more and more onto our already full plates. Our default is to accept new opportunities. We often add activities, relationships, projects, and extra-curiculars without an end goal in mind. We don’t even properly evaluate our current commitments before we add more. Without conscientiousness, we are pulled into a life of complexity. But we still have a choice. If we take the time, we can identify, evaluate, and eliminate- so we are left with only the simple things in life that truly bring us joy. We must actively seek the optimal path for ourselves and direct our life course to it. Continue reading The Pull of Complexity