The Broke Millionaire Athlete in Us All

We’ve all read that crazy teaser of a story about the rich millionaire athlete that made a fortune only to blow it all and be completely broke a few years after they finish playing their tysonsport of choice. The Mike Tysons of the world who earn $300 Million just to end up bankrupt one year into “retirement”. There is something sadistic and intriguing about the unwise financial choices others make. It certainly becomes story-worthy when the numbers are in the millions.

However, as much as we prefer not to admit it, we all have a little broke millionaire athlete in us. In fact, we tend to make the same money mistakes without the media spotlight or the spectacular meltdowns of well known celebrities. So, why are we just like the millionaire athletes that go broke? Do we make the same money mistakes as the ultra rich? Continue reading The Broke Millionaire Athlete in Us All

Finding Our Place In The Class Stratification

I’m not really sure what I want to be when I grow up. For that matter, I’m not really sure where I want to fit in socioeconomically. I also understand that, by simply having all choices available, I’m already predisposed to certain social alignments. I’m not a sociologist. In fact, I’ve never formally studied sociology. However, I’ve traveled enough to observe the perils and benefits of extreme class differentiation and, by no effort of my own, I’ve been exposed to the most astounding poverty and wealth imaginable.

classesIt is a strange proposition to step back and determine the way we want to define our family socially. Most likely, we simply take our cues from our parents and strive to meet their expectations. Our peer groups, school choices, career paths, and financial decisions are all heavily influenced by our home environment and exposures to unique experiences. It is funny, but most of my peers and family members would strive to be part of the “Middle Class.” But really, its more like the highest echelons of middle class or maybe even the suburban upper class. But certainly, at minimum, everyone is striving to be in the Global 1% Club. Where do you fit in? Did you choose your societal class? It is based on your family, your income, or your choices? Are you comfortable where you are? Continue reading Finding Our Place In The Class Stratification

My Experiments: Adding 30Lbs of Muscle in One Year

I am extremely fascinated by how the human body works. I thoroughly enjoy self-experimentation and breaking misconceptions we have about our own predispositions. When I was growing up, I was always on the small side. I had a very late birthday and typically was one of the smallest people in the entire school. When I finished high school I weighed about 125Lbs at 5’9” or so. I remember specifically choosing my competitive sports based on the biological makeup of my body. I learned early on that tackle football was a no-go, but wrestling and running (Cross Country & Track) were sports that are competitive even for individuals on the lighter side of the high school scale.

gymWhen I began college I quickly embraced the delicious, all-you-can-eat buffets of my college’s dining hall. I had plenty of free time to workout and eat lots of tasty food. I quickly gained fifteen pounds my first semester and finished my first year at about 145. I actually grew a few inches in college so, despite adding several pounds, I still remained on the skinnier side. The next several years I stayed approximately the same weight. It would fluctuate by a few pounds here or there but I can certainly wear the exact same clothes I wore my freshmen year now.

I assumed I would pretty much always be a relatively small guy. My family actually has people of many different sizes, but the average would be approximately the American normal. I’m not sure what my “natural” weight is but over the last ten years I’ve found it difficult to really change my BMI. The lose weight vs gain weight debate is also interesting. The irony of both weight loss and weight gain is that many of the principles and mechanics are quite similar. Although we all have different basel metabolic rates, there are certainly basic equations that guide our consumption to mass ratio. I certainly learned quite a bit about losing weight while wrestling competitively, but I’ve always found it much harder for me to build and maintain muscle mass. Continue reading My Experiments: Adding 30Lbs of Muscle in One Year

How Many Square Feet Do We Need to Be Happy?

We are having a debate. Or at least I am having a debate. I’m faced with internal dilemma of trying to figure out where I want to live in the coming months (and years). As a family, we are anticipating many different changes in the next few years, but most likely one will involve buying a new house in the town where we currently live. We really like the home we are in. In fact, we will probably keep it as a rental unit even after we buy a new one. Our house is modest in size for our area and the price per square foot of real estate is super inexpensive where we live. We can easily afford a lot of house, but what do we actually need? All the internal discussion boils down to the question: how many square feet do we need to be happy?

My History With Big Houses
houseIn Georgia, where I’ve spent the vast majority of my life, houses are really big. We have lots of space, a major home building industry, plenty of forestry products and sprawling urban and suburban business centers. I grew up in a family of six and my parents turned our 3/2 into a space with bedrooms for all by the time I finished high school. For several years I had a massive basement to spend the majority of my time. In college, I shared a 185sf dorm with a roommate, followed by a fraternity house with 35 other guys and finally a room in a large house to myself. After college I moved to Manila and lived in a small 200sf studio. Upon getting married, we stayed in a 1,200sf condo before moving into our own 390sf studio for several years. Finally, we moved into our current 850sf home of efficiently laid out urban space with our family of four. (Picture is of a move in ready house that just sold in our town for about 190k, 3,600sf, $829 Monthly payment) Continue reading How Many Square Feet Do We Need to Be Happy?