I’ll Be Happy When…

I’ll be happy when I get a raise. I’ll be happy when I lose 10 pounds. I’ll be happy when we move into that new house. I’ll be happy when I meet that special someone. I’ll be happy when the little one sleeps though the night, or when they’re out of diapers, or going off to school, or finally graduating. Hey, I’ll be happy when I get the job. Maybe I’ll finally be happy when I retire. Wait, will I ever be happy?

Ill be happy whenTake a moment to evaluate yourself. How is this season going for you? What is making you happy? What is causing you to be stressed? What will likely change and what will remain consistent? I spent a little time thinking through the various positive things in my life and also considered many of the unique stressors that are impacting my current environment. Sure, having a toddler and newborn bring about some new challenges, but the excitement of watching the little guys learn and play is incredible. The seasons will change but the challenges will only evolve as we age. They certainly will not go away. Part of living a happy, healthy life is understanding our mental tendencies and learning to appreciate the challenging seasons of life we are all certain to face. Continue reading I’ll Be Happy When…

Time Poverty of the Ultra Rich

A billionaire’s conference? I didn’t know such a thing existed. I was listening* to a discussion the other day about a conference put on exclusively for billionaires. Founding members of the conference noticed a strange phenomena. Although the conference was originally planned as a week-long event, none of the wealthiest individuals on the planet could actually attend the entire time. Most were only able to come for a day or two. The irony is simple- wouldn’t the wealthiest people in the world have the greatest ability to take a few days off? The surprising answer is No. Although we currently do not have billions, a lot of us fall into similar situations as our careers, incomes, commitments, expectations, and responsibilities grow and mature. The question begs to be asked: Is the money we make bringing us any closer to actual freedom?

stressThis observation has also been discussed on the other end of the spectrum when looking at individuals with very little money but plenty of margin. Although the case is compelling, Simple Economist readers tend to be high income earners with above average accumulation rates. In essence, we actually have to deal with a different set of challenges and expectations that arise when our incomes go up, even if we are maintaining consistency in our levels of consumption. We must be attuned to the fact that income often comes with responsibility and, if we are not careful, can limit our freedom rather than add to it. Continue reading Time Poverty of the Ultra Rich

Why We Paid Off Our Mortgage at 30

Is it wise to pay off your mortgage early? The debate about when to pay off a mortgage seems to be a popular one in the financial world. Some prevailing financial personalities abhor debt and suggest paying it off at all cost. Others (including many finance professors & rich dad) seem to enjoy low-rate mortgages, and fundamentally love the idea of a leveraged debt position. I’m not really sure there is a right or wrong answer in the debate, but I know we have chosen a side and I’m pretty happy with where we currently sit.

Pay off house earlyAbout three years ago we found a little house we liked in a great southern town. We saved pretty aggressively after we got married so we had a good down payment to go with a small mortgage. We fixed up the little house and it has been a great place to live as our family has begun to multiply. Although we chose a traditional 15 year mortgage, we realized if we put a little extra towards the house we could pay it off pretty quickly. Once the idea was planted, we focused, and ended up paying it off much faster than our initial estimates. So, why did we pay off the house? Why not invest the money in the market instead? Is it ever smart to pay off low-interest debt? Continue reading Why We Paid Off Our Mortgage at 30

100 Days of Real Food

“Eat food, mostly plants, and not too much” says Michael Pollan in his book about¬†eating simply. Our diets can become extremely complicated with all of the choices available and the extras that have been added into the products that line the grocery store shelves. Even when we try to eat healthily, many of the products we buy are filled with highly processed ingredients that do not even sound like food. Overall, our family tends to eat a pretty balanced diet, but occasionally¬†we like to try new things to challenge ourselves and break the routine of our weekly diet. So, bring on the 100 Days challenge.

100daysWe discovered 100 Days of Real Food a couple years ago while searching through food/nutrition blogs, and have completed the 100 days challenge in the past (a 100 days without eating any highly processed, refined food). The blogger and creator, Lisa Leake, implemented this meal plan in her family, saw amazing results and is now challenging others to do the same. The plan simply promotes healthy eating, learning to read the ingredient labels on packages, and removing highly processed foods. We conveniently received her cookbook for Christmas, and thought the new year would be the perfect time to start.

Health is one of the most important aspects of lifestyle design. It is hard to do anything efficiently when our bodies feel bad or we do not have energy. So fueling up with healthy foods is a must for feeling good, sleeping well, and overall productivity. 100 Days is really about simplifying our food choices and removing all of the crazy substances that have crept into our food over the last fifty years. -SE

Continue reading 100 Days of Real Food