The Timeful Productivity System

I’m always looking for something to improve my efficiency and help process the never ending to-do list of life. I’ve tried different types of productivity systems over the years and taken bits and pieces from each. Although personal productivity is highly individualized, there have been several recurring themes across many popular systems. I’ve enjoyed Ariely‘s books and content for years, and his behavioral economics approach to time management resonated with me.

timeful logoI’ve read through all of Allen and Leo‘s stuff and incorporated that into my timeful productivity system. I don’t use the dedicated smartphone app, but I have adapted various parts of timeful productivity to my exact needs. This has helped me get a lot more done. I’ve come to realize that I tend to be more productive when I have more to do. I don’t waste as much time- however, I’m not immune to the effects of Parkinson’s law.

Basically, the timeful productivity system (or at least my modified version) is quite similar to a zero based financial budget. In essence, you are budgeting your time each day. The trick is simply to budget for all of it- including non-productive time. In addition, uni-tasking, structured procrastination, and productivity patterns are all facets of the timeful productivity system. Continue reading The Timeful Productivity System

New: I Recommend Page

Services | Products | Books | Blogs | Everything

One of the main tenants of Simple Economist is simply being efficient with our spending decisions. This often means buying fewer things and being mindful of the items we do purchase. We frequently get asked about different products or services we actually use and have truly enjoyed over the years. Here is a collection of different things we can personally recommend to our readers. This page will constantly be updated as we experiment and try new things but many of our recommended companies, services, and books have been consistent over the years.

We do a lot of research before we make any recommendation but many individuals have unique situations that make specific selections a personal decision. We are always looking for improvement so let us know if you feel like there is a better option or we are missing a clearly excellent product or service. If we like your recommendation better, we will update our page to reflect the changes.

Bloggers are often supported by referral links in their articles. A few of the companies listed happen to offer commissions for online referrals. Several others do not. We do not make our recommendations based on revenue, but where available, we use special links so that this blog will get a credit if you end up becoming a customer. It is an optional way to support this blog so we can continue to write and provide great content!

Continue reading New: I Recommend Page

Living Intentionally (And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance)

Everyone I know wants to live a fulfilled life. Almost everyone I know would agree that paying a little more attention would make our lives better. Living intentionally is simply a lifestyle that attempts to live according to our values and beliefs. Although the term “Living Intentionally” may be a bit clichéd, the underlying premise is timeless. Prioritizing your life so that your values and interests determine your lifestyle is vital for anyone who wishes to live a fulfilled life.

living intentionallyI really enjoy reading. I try to read a few different books each month if possible. And, if not a book, I’m spending hours reading different types of content across various other mediums. Rarely does a book capture a concept so eloquently that it sears into my psyche. I don’t read a lot that falls within the philosophy genre. I do however enjoy stories that illustrate philosophical points in entertaining ways. Zen and the Art does have a way of polarizing readers into camps of love or hate. I wouldn’t say I love every aspect about the book, but several passages are incredibly mesmerizing.

I stumbled upon the 1974 modern classic, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, after seeing a post about it make the front page of reddit earlier this year. I wasn’t really looking for zen and I’ve never owned a motorcycle. Although I actually do have my motorcycle license, I spend a lot more time on the bicycle than anything else. I think biking is actually even more connected and a better illustration of intentionality than a motorized cycle. Continue reading Living Intentionally (And The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance)

Buy For Life

We live in a disposable culture. We are constantly being introduced to objects with low price tags and seemingly even lower shelf-lives.  We often find ourselves with more stuff due to the excess junk that surrounds us. Each week we are introduced to cheaply imported, lower quality, disposable versions of what we already have. And we buy it in order to save a few ticks on the altar of convenience. I’ve contributed. Over the years I’ve purchased plenty of low quality, disposable items that I’ve used and discarded. I’ve also purchased inexpensive things only to have them break a few weeks later after a couple of uses. It doesn’t take an economist very long to put together the notion that high quality items uniquely provide a better experience and often cost less in the long run.

SBL-BC-800x380Buying for life is a philosophy we have adopted when purchasing non-consumable items for our family. The notion of buying for life is simply about acquiring high quality, timeless items that will last a very long time. It often requires a bit more capital up front, but the returns come about for years since the well crafted items rarely break or need to be replaced. High quality items can often be repaired instead of being tossed thus contributing to a slightly smaller pile of junk in our municipal wastelands. Buying for life is the antithesis of our disposable culture. Continue reading Buy For Life